Tillandsia Skulls…

So I’m super excited to finally be able introduce my ‘Tillandsia Skulls’! What do yous think? Have a look through them and tell me what one’s your fave!

Natural White Water Mark.png
Natural Neutral Side Water Mark
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Natural White 2 Water Mark
Natural White Side Water Mark
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Natural Neutral Water Mark
Galaxy Gemstone Water marked

I’ve been working hard on them for the past few weeks figuring out things like scale and paint finishes, refining the sculpting process and finding out what looks cool as inserts. (Sea glass and gemstones are a yes!)

They’re hand sculpted from clay, dried, painted and then paired with their Tillandsia (airplant) horns. Each skull ends up being completely unique due to the nature of their creation – I just can’t sculpt the exact same shape each time! I can get close, but they’re not clones. The skulls come with a hole in the back of them allowing them to be hung on your wall.

Tillandsias are usually pretty hardy; they enjoy a bright room but not direct sunlight and require a light misting every week or so with plain water. I’d advise removing them from your wall to do this in case you end up with water spots on your wallpaper or paint. There’s no need to worry about the paint on the skull though, as it’s been varnished and therefore mist proof!

I’ve not yet listed any on my Etsy shop as I’m reserving their debut for my craft-show appearance on the 12th and 13th this month. It’s in Livingston Shopping center so if you’re around be sure to come say hi! I’ll also have my plantosaurs and tote bags with me. (Also stay tuned for a peek at what my stall will hopefully look like on the day.)

Website…

So I’m trying to take my craft selling a little more seriously. I worked hard to take some ‘good looking’ product shots and opened up my Etsy shop. Hooray!

The next step was to sort out was my website. I bought my domain name years ago but never got round to doing anything with it, the idea of building my own website seemed too scary so I procrastinated. Until last week and got stuck in to it.

Funnily enough it was enjoyable in a way, kind of satisfying. And whilst not the slickest of websites, I suppose it does the job. So please have a look, (click on the photo below) and let me know what you think as sometimes with being the ‘creator’ it means you’re too close to see it’s faults.

Welcome

Monday Make: Radish Bag…

So for some reason I took a hankering to do some lino printing at the weekend, having never touched my tools in probably years. (Ever have one of those moods that appear by random for something random? Weird ae.) I also had some spare canvas bags kicking around and therefore the perfect combo for a ‘Monday Make’ was born. A radish printed bag!

The following admission shouldn’t make me a terrible person, I certainly know die hard lino fans will be spitting out their coffee and reeling in horror but… I know I said lino printing, I actually cheat and use that vinyl lino as I find it way easier to carve as it’s softer and smoother.

The material I used were as follows;
Canvas Bag
Fabric Paint
Pen
Pencil
Paper
Roller
Vinyl Lino
Lino Carving Tools
Scissors

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I started by drawing out a simplified sketch of a radish. It was important for me to keep it simple as I was firstly out of practice and didn’t fancy trying to carve anything too complex and secondly I was going to print it as a repeating pattern and didn’t want the over-all effect to look too busy.

I then traced the design in pencil on to some layout paper and did the whole pencil transfer thing by scribbling all over the back. As the vinyl is grey, the pencil marks can be pretty hard to see so I advise going over them in pen.

Then it was time for the fun part, the carving! There’s probably I proper technique to doing it, but I start by craving the outline and then working from there to remove all the excess. Top tip – just take your time, remember you can always remove but never put back!

The other fun part (can there be two fun parts?) is testing out the stamp for the first time. I chose to cut my radish in half so I could have the leaves green and the radish red. I applied the paint by brush (usually it’s by roller, sorry lino printers. Better go make yourself another coffee again and put on a new t-shirt.) and pressed it on to the paper. Obviously on bigger stamping blocks using a roller would give a smooth, even coverage but for little radishes I think brushes are just fine! I like the look of the brush strokes, I think it gives it a little more of a rustic charm no?

test-print

As I was happy with the way the stamp printed, it was time to put radish on to canvas. I added a little more paint to one side of the radish after it was printed to help achieve a rounded, shaded look as I felt it looked a little flat.

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Press, print, repeat and soon you’ll have a lovely canvas bag covered in radishes. The fabric paint I used needs to be ironed for 5 minutes before it’s ‘fixed’ on to the fabric so make sure you read the instructions of yours. Nobody wants their radishes running in the rain!

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Has anyone ever printed before? I think it’s quite a satisfying, easy craft to do and get in to – it’s a little addictive to be honest as I’ve already made a strawberry and carrot bag too!